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Research

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Research

What Is Known

The first symptoms of Alzheimer vary from person to person. For many, decline in non-memory aspects of cognition, such as language, vision/spatial issues, and impaired reasoning or judgment, may signal the very early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers are studying biomarkers (biological signs of disease found in brain images, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood) to see if they can detect early changes in the brain. Studies indicate that such early detection may be possible, but more research is needed before these techniques can be relied upon to diagnose Alzheimer disease in everyday medical practice.

Yasser's Story

"Memories and emotions have a universal value. They belong to all of us; they define the personal history of humanity. Every time that Alzheimer's disease takes away a memory and its associated emotions, the world is diminished. We can not waste time, we should fight to stop such losses. I believe we will find a cure. We must persist."

What's Happening Now

Today, Alzheimer is at the forefront of biomedical research. Ninety percent of what we know about Alzheimer has been discovered in the last 15 years. Some of the most remarkable progress has shed light on how Alzheimer affects the brain. The hope is this better understanding will lead to new treatments. Many potential approaches are currently under investigation worldwide.

MARC supports the work of two scientists whose research takes place in Montreal, but has a global impact.

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Dr. Andréa C. Leblanc

Dr. Andréa C. Leblanc is a James McGill Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University and a researcher at the Bloomfield Center for Research in Aging in the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research in Montreal.

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Dr. Alan C. Evans

Dr. Alan Evans is James McGill Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Biomedical Engineering at McGill and a world authority on brain mapping with imaging technologies.

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